self-government ~ autonomie

Definition

Self-government is the government of a political unit by its own people.

— Source:  WordWeb laptop dictionary.

 

Take good note:  Self-determination and self-rule are two synonyms for self-government.

Moreover, self-rule is not “racist”.  Excluding dissimilar others from your own group for the purpose of self-government  to maintain the necessary ethnic balance to regulate your own community  according to your own culture, views and temperament — is not racist.  Self-government is a fundamental human right, as the international accords (below) all agree.

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Charter of the United Nations

INTRODUCTION

Delegates of 50 nations met at San Francisco between April 25 and June 26, 1945 and agreed upon the UN Charter, the founding document of the United Nations.

The decolonization efforts of the United Nations derive from the UN Charter’s principle of “equal rights and self-determination of peoples” as well as from three specific chapters in the Charter devoted to the interests of dependent peoples:

Chapter XI: Declaration regarding Non-Self-Governing Territories
Chapter XII: International Trusteeship System
Chapter XIII: The Trusteeship Council.

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Charter of the United Nations

EXCERPT

CHAPTER I: PURPOSES AND PRINCIPLES

Article 1

The Purposes of the United Nations are:

1.  To maintain international peace and security, and to that end: to take effective collective measures for the prevention and removal of threats to the peace, and for the suppression of acts of aggression or other breaches of the peace, and to bring about by peaceful means, and in conformity with the principles of justice and international law, adjustment or settlement of international disputes or situations which might lead to a breach of the peace;

2.  To develop friendly relations among nations based on respect for the principle of equal rights and self-determination of peoples, and to take other appropriate measures to strengthen universal peace;

3.  To achieve international co-operation in solving international problems of an economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian character, and in promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and for fundamental freedoms for all without distinction as to race, sex, language, or religion; and

To be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations in the attainment of these common ends.

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EXCERPT

CHAPTER IX: INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC
AND SOCIAL CO-OPERATION

Article 55

With a view to the creation of conditions of stability and well-being which are necessary for peaceful and friendly relations among nations based on respect for the principle of equal rights and self-determination of peoples, the United Nations shall promote:

a.  higher standards of living, full employment, and conditions of economic and social progress and development;

b.  solutions of international economic, social, health, and related problems; and international cultural and educational cooperation; and

c.  universal respect for, and observance of, human rights and fundamental freedoms for all without distinction as to race, sex, language, or religion.

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International Covenant on
Civil and Political Rights

EXCERPT

Adopted and opened for signature, ratification and accession by General Assembly resolution 2200A (XXI) of 16 December 1966
entry into force 23 March 1976, in accordance with Article 49

[….]

PART I

Article 1

1.  All peoples have the right of self-determination.  By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development.

2.  All peoples may, for their own ends, freely dispose of their natural wealth and resources without prejudice to any obligations arising out of international economic co-operation, based upon the principle of mutual benefit, and international law.  In no case may a people be deprived of its own means of subsistence.

3.  The States Parties to the present Covenant, including those having responsibility for the administration of Non-Self-Governing and Trust Territories, shall promote the realization of the right of self-determination, and shall respect that right, in conformity with the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations.

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Declaration on the Granting of Independence
to Colonial Countries and Peoples

EXCERPT

Adopted by General Assembly resolution 1514 (XV) of 14 December 1960

The General Assembly,

Mindful of the determination proclaimed by the peoples of the world* in the Charter of the United Nations to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small and to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,

Conscious of the need for the creation of conditions of stability and well-being and peaceful and friendly relations based on respect for the principles of equal rights and self-determination of all peoples, and of universal respect for, and observance of, human rights and fundamental freedoms for all without distinction as to race, sex, language or religion,

[….]

And to this end Declares that:

1.  The subjection of peoples to alien subjugation, domination and exploitation constitutes a denial of fundamental human rights, is contrary to the Charter of the United Nations and is an impediment to the promotion of world peace and co-operation.

2.  All peoples have the right to self-determination; by virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development.

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Notes:  One of the great ironies of the U.N. Charter is the statement that the “peoples of the world” “proclaimed” it.  Elsewhere, the UN Charter and accords declare that the will of the people is the basis of all governmental power.  The “will of the people,” meaning democracy, is ascertained by the vote, in advance  of the measures to be adopted.

The billions of people of the world, however, were not invited to vote on whether they wanted a UNO, or on the contents of the U.N. Charter and Accords, all of which were simply imposed without their knowledge or consent.  Indeed, most had not been (and still have not been) educated to competently form intent and register a vote.

There is currently a movement afoot, the UNPA — a petition for an elected assembly at the U.N., in other words, an elected world government.  This would merely confer the illusion of democracy upon an institution created by self-imposed elites and in whose constitution and viewpoints from the very outset, the peoples of the world have had no say.  This does not, however, subtract from the reality which the UN had no choice but to recognize:  self-government is a fundamental human right.  It is, however, a right that the same U.N., through other provisions, and by its own actions (in support of mass migration into the West, for example), is itself attempting to erode!

Indeed, the principle of self-determination can be misused to destroy countries by fomenting discord and altering conditions within them to such an extent that host peoples who are adversely affected will want to secede to try to recover the self-determination which they had to begin with.  The U.N., as an outside agency, should have no power and no influence on fundamental national issues such as migration and immigration.  In the Canadian context, all such influence is a usurpation of our federal and provincial powers over immigration, a fundamental issue of self-government.